Wordsmith


From Roawenwood for A Tattered Page: 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, the Sea Escapes Aquarium.  Wood and hammered metal form a Jules Verne inspired fantasy seascape.

Here is the section of the book that sparked the design:


Suddenly, through two oblong openings, daylight appeared on both sides of the lounge.  The liquid masses came into view, brightly lit by the ship's electric outpourings.  We were separated from the sea by two panes of glass.  I shuddered at the thought that these fragile partitions could break; but strong copper bands secured them, giving them nearly infinite resistance………..In wonderment, we leaned on our elbows before these show windows, and our stunned silence remained unbroken…

"Ah!"  I exclaimed.  "I see our captain's way of life!  He's found himself a separate world that saves its most astonishing wonders just for him!"

* * * * * * * * *

In a late night conversation a good friend called me a Wordsmith.  I hadn't thought of myself in that way, but it is likely true. I apparently practice wordsmithery (I like THAT word a lot).

He also said he sometimes felt I was trying to intimidate him with my esoteric (well, damn there is one example right there) words.  I answered with a resounding "no, that isn't it!"

Communication is difficult. Whether between two people or among an author and his readers, the goal is to move ideas and visions from one mind to another. Words are the vehicles. The closer the word is to the idea that wants to be imparted, the better the communication.

Taking most any word and looking in the thesaurus (and yes, I did have a very thick book version back in the pre-Google days) it is easy to see that each similar word carries its own subtle meaning. The "flavor" is different. So picking just the right words can help the communication process.

Of course the person hearing or reading those words also needs to know them.

If you feel the desire to enhance your word toolbox, A.Word.A.Day might be a fun place to start.